Trump and Africa: reciprocity will be key

Original Content Provided by: Frank Samolis, as interviewed by Shannon Manders
Edited for the purposes of this site by: Lina Abisoghomyan
 
  Source: Africa Independent

Source: Africa Independent

The Players

 

Trump Administration- as presidential candidate made claims to take a strong stance on American jobs, and particularly to keep them in the US at any cost.

Obama Administration- did not, in fact surprisingly, expand the agreement. The PowerAfrica and Electrify Africa Act were huge steps for expansion of influence, and establishment of precedent for involvement in Africa. They are perhaps some of the few initiative the Trump administration will continue.

AGOA- this is the only trade agreement large enough to be considered a threat to American jobs. It is not, however. In fact, AGOA represents a positive opportunity for US jobs by having strong commercial ties to Africa that would drive up demand for American goods.

  Source: The Habari Network

Source: The Habari Network

The Background

There is no evidence to suggest radical changes to Africa policy with the new Trump presidency. Why? Simply because he doesn't have the capacity or power to do so. In fact, it's not even necessary unless for any reason the AGOA or any other Africa trade begins to directly affect American jobs. 

  Source: Dipnote

Source: Dipnote

The Story

The Trump administration would actually be more likely to continue to develop trade with Africa, particularly in the commercial sector by improving the AGOA. It is one of the few cases where liberalization would be beneficial to the campaign's goals. The exports to the US from Africa are mostly raw goods, and it would look like Trump may actually reach out for further negotiations. It may also serve the dual purpose of countering Chinese influence, by stabilizing vulnerable countries through an influx ofprivate money and public aid dollars.