Doctor, Doctor... Where Did You Go?

Original content created by Lina Abisoghomyan
        Photo Credit: Press TV

      Photo Credit: Press TV

A trashed hospital in Donetsk after it is hit by Separatist artillery fire


The Players:

Medical personnel- By the truckload, personnel is running away, far from the affected areas being constantly shelled by artillery despite the Minsk agreement. It's understandable- they're not themselves protected, and salaries have been withheld since October. 

The people of Donetsk- mostly elderly, as those who are able to flee have already fled to protect themselves from the constant artillery fire. The elderly are also the most helpless in getting medical attention because of their lack of mobility.

  Photo Credit: Kiev News

Photo Credit: Kiev News

A makeshift hospital is minimally equipped, and personnel are mostly trained doctors acting as volunteers

The Background

Medical aid is needed now more than ever in the the region of Donetsk, but the supply of medical personnel is dwindling. It's a touchy topic, and it's a difficult moral question- steady pay is almost unheard of nowadays, as there is no consensus on what government should pay the doctors, and individuals themselves barely have money to survive let alone pay medical bills. There is a small group of moral idealists that have stayed behind to help in whatever way they can, but largely doctors are leaving in convoys in fear of their own safety.

  Photo Credit: Medlines.org

Photo Credit: Medlines.org

Patients are brought in by family members, volunteers, and neighbours into this deserted hospital

The Story

In a desperate effort to get doctors back into the region, the interim government has offered any kind of medical personnel great incentives. Some are offered newly renovated homes to live in, others living expenses paid for. This model, however, has not been proved sustainable on the larger scale yet as there is no central government to coordinate it. Medical students in the city have advocated for participation and aid of the civilians to the best of the doctors' ability, but at the same time are having trouble sustaining themselves in fulfilling what they see as their moral obligation as doctors. 

 

Thumbnail Photo Credits: VOA News